About the Councils


South Oxfordshire and Vale of White Horse district councils have been at the forefront of innovation and partnership in local government since we became a shared management team in 2008.

The success of this innovative approach led us to extend the partnership and since 2010 all members of staff have been part of a single tem working cross both organisations. This has delivered considerable economies of scale for both councils, but also given our staff even more scope to diversify their experience and develop their careers. The two councils remain politically autonomous, but with greater capacity to draw from, and are well placed to respond to shared issues.

South Oxfordshire is a largely rural district, transected by the River Thames and is home to just under 150,000 people. Main towns in the district include Didcot, Henley-on-Thames, Thame and Wallingford. We have excellent connections into Oxford City, Reading and London.

The current political structure of the council is as follows:

  • Liberal Democrat  13
  • Conservative  9
  • Green 6
  • Labour  3
  • Henley Residents' Group  3
  • Independent   1
  • Non-Group Councillor  1

The council’s corporate plan is under review with our new administration but currently outlines our commitment to shaping a great place with thriving communities, and defines our strategic objectives as follows:

  • Invest in the district’s future
  • Unlock the potential of Didcot
  • Homes and jobs for everyone
  • Build thriving communities
  • Services that reflect residents’ needs
  • Be tough on enforcement

Named after the famous white horse carved into the chalk hills at Uffington, Vale of White Horse is home to approximately 135,000 people. Our main towns are Abingdon, Faringdon and Wantage and have good access into Oxford and Swindon.

The current political structure of the council is as follows:

  • Liberal Democrat    31
  • Conservative     6
  • Green   1

The council’s corporate plan is under review with our new administration but currently has four strategic objectives for the period 2016 to 20120:

  • Housing and infrastructure
  • Sustainable communities and wellbeing
  • Building an even stronger economy
  • Running an efficient council

 

The two councils remain politically autonomous, but with greater capacity to draw from, and are well placed to respond to shared issues.